Plastic Surgery Trends in 2016

In 2016, we’ll see a rise in liposuction and Botox procedures. Breast augmentation is in steady demand, although women do not desire overly voluptuous figures. “Modern Family” actress Ariel Winter, who had breast reduction surgery this year, is also reported to have influenced this “smaller breasts” trend.

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Unorthodox buttocks surgeries are on the rise, mainly due to their importation from and popularity in Brazil. They continue to pose risks and are not recommended by top experts in the field. Some “bottom-heavy” trends among the “stars” have also influenced the market (Kardashian). As politeness turns into political correctness, one ceases to be “fat” and is to be defined as “more shapely.”

Kardashian

Smaller enhancements are more in fashion than multiple surgeries, mainly due to the steady bombardment of the market by companies promising “painless and fast” fat loss, skin improvement etc. What they often omit to say is that such “fast losses” just as quickly vanish. An average non-surgical treatment of an “area” will last 1-2 years before it has to be repeated.

In 2015, we have already marked a steady increase in face and neck lift surgeries, approximately 25% more compared to 2014. “People take ‘selfies’ and that’s what they see,” Dr. Fisher says. “Camera resolution, instant availability, online presence… people are more self-critical. That is where we, experts in body-sculpting, can truly make a difference.”

DCIS

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is the most common type of non-invasive breast cancer. Ductal means that the cancer starts inside the milk ducts, carcinoma refers to any cancer that begins in the skin or other tissues (including breast tissue) that cover or line the internal organs, and in situ means “in its original place.” DCIS is called “non-invasive” because it hasn’t spread beyond the milk duct into any normal surrounding breast tissue. DCIS isn’t life-threatening, but having DCIS can increase the risk of developing an invasive breast cancer later on.

When you have had DCIS, you are at higher risk for the cancer coming back or for developing a new breast cancer than a person who has never had breast cancer before. Most recurrences happen within the 5 to 10 years after initial diagnosis. The chances of a recurrence are under 30%.

Women who have breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) for DCIS without radiation therapy have about a 25% to 30% chance of having a recurrence at some point in the future. Including radiation therapy in the treatment plan after surgery drops the risk of recurrence to about 15%. Learn what additional steps you can take to lower your risk of a new breast cancer diagnosis or a recurrence in the Lower Your Risk section. If breast cancer does come back after earlier DCIS treatment, the recurrence is non-invasive (DCIS again) about half the time and invasive about half the time. (DCIS itself is NOT invasive.)

Here is an actual case:

43 year old with palpable breast mass biopsied in 2006 with results showing fibroadenoma. The mass has grown (now 3cm) and she is having a gyne surgery and wants the mass removed while in OR.

1st step: excisional biopsy, do pathology, send it out

2nd step: atypical fibroepithelial lesion with 2.5mm focus of DCIS? Margins negative for DCIS but positive for atypical cells? Do an MRI. Any enhancement pattern surrounding complete lumpectomy cavity consistent with atypia or DCIS?

3rd step: re-excision margins where atypical cells show, further excision to clear the margin, then XRT

4th step: no further radiotherapy, possible chemo

Diet after Liposuction

Sarah Condor-Fisher, Ph.D. is an expert legal contributor to Rick Amato show, broadcast on Sirius XM, Breibart.com, and http://amatotalk.com/podcasts/

Cosmetic Surgery and Laser Center of Cerritos

Obviously, what you eat after liposuction is crucial. Do not go to any extreme diet right away. Changes should be gradual but should accommodate your new self. You have taken the first step to your happiness. Eliminate sugar. Sugar is a disaccharide which contributes to your weight nothing but empty calories. Before sugar became widely spread, during the 18th and 19th century, people used only honey to sweeten their food and drinks. There were fewer obese people and fewer heart attacks. People died of other causes, for most of which we have cures today. If you need a sweetener, use the artificial one, but also with discretion. Remember that sweetness (the taste buds on your tongue and in your mouth) recedes relatively quickly. If you eliminate all sweet food from your diet for 4-6 weeks, the “sweet tooth” cravings will go away.

Meat can be just as dangerous…

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Diet after Liposuction

Obviously, what you eat after liposuction is crucial. Do not go to any extreme diet right away. Changes should be gradual but should accommodate your new self. You have taken the first step to your happiness. Eliminate sugar. Sugar is a disaccharide which contributes to your weight nothing but empty calories. Before sugar became widely spread, during the 18th and 19th century, people used only honey to sweeten their food and drinks. There were fewer obese people and fewer heart attacks. People died of other causes, for most of which we have cures today. If you need a sweetener, use the artificial one, but also with discretion. Remember that sweetness (the taste buds on your tongue and in your mouth) recedes relatively quickly. If you eliminate all sweet food from your diet for 4-6 weeks, the “sweet tooth” cravings will go away.

Meat can be just as dangerous as sugar when used without discretion. The diets rich in protein, which are so common today, are misguided to the extent to which they are based on exceptionally healthy and fit individuals who exercise and need increased protein consumption. If you are not one of these individuals, stop worrying about protein in your diet. Eliminate red meat, save for an occasional steak or “pleasure meal” and focus on white meat and eggs. No, you need not worry about cholesterols either. If you do not supply them to your body in the diet, the body will manufacture them, because it needs to have some.

Finally, avoid fat in all forms. Do not add fat on your salads, do not think that you should add extra olive oil because it is healthy, and do not – ever! – mix carbohydrates and fat, such as fried potatoes or cakes where flour is mixed with butter… Substitute water, vinegar, lemon juice, if you must have that cake. Use Teflon pans, cook your potatoes or better still, have a bowl of rice.

(This advice comes to you from Miss World and Miss USA in Natural Bodybuilding – Physique, INBA/PNBA professional natural athlete, Sarah Condor-Fisher, Ph.D. For more, see her book on nutrition on Amazon and Barnes and Noble.)

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Troubled by Lines?

For your forehead, Botox and Dysport would be your first choice. Dysport is a possible alternative to Botox. It works in a similar way, keeps muscles relaxed and does not cause wrinkles. Dermal fillers (Juvederm and Radiesse) will be used when minor filling is necessary (e.g. lines on your forehead). Lasers apply heat energy to help create new collagen fibers and may also be used.

Lines between the brows are created by the procerus and corrugator muscles. In severe cases, these muscles can be removed by a procedure involving an upper eyelid incision. This procedure may be a viable long-lasting alternative for those who have had poor results from Botox and are reluctant to try it again (all fillers have to be re-applied).

Breast Cancer – BRCA 2

BRCA 2 is a DNA repair mutation, which prevents (other) DNA mutations which might effectively prevent cancer. Survival rate does not depend on your age, but on the progress of this malignancy. BRCA is more dangerous in that it prevents DNA repair and thus precludes or minimizes the efficiency of chemotherapy. Prophylactic mastectomy is to a greater benefit in BRCA patients, provided that they survive the primary treatment, because the systemic risk of the initial malignancy will not be altered. If the malignancy has been characterized as “node-negative,” it is also a good sign.

Plastic Surgery Success Is Yours

Women that underwent facial rejuvenation surgery (facelift) are perceived as more attractive and more likeable, which reflects in their everyday life and employment. JAMA plastic surgery journal last week reported this saying that it illustrates a phenomenon known as “facial profiling,” an assemblage of cues we gather about other people from visual contact, in particular their facial expressions.

“This is part and parcel of our evolutionary makeup,” says Dr. Gregory Fisher, the expert plastic surgeon at Cosmetic Surgery and Laser Center of Cerritos. “We use it to assess the danger as well as likelihood of success in our daily interactions.” Dr. Fisher wrote extensively on body image and our perception of our selves. “This is another aspect of the same issue,” he told our interviewer, “we tend to approximate not only likenesses and dislikes to the dynamic facial expressions of others, but we also compare those and subliminally turn them inside-out, so as to align them with ours where possible and reject them if we find no likeness or similarity. Then there are what you may call ‘standard features’ of sadness, anger, etc. These  were first described in the book entitled  Mécanisme de la Physionomie Humaine by Guillaume Duchenne who used electric stimulation to determine which muscles were responsible for different facial expressions. Charles Darwin subsequently used Duchenne’s research in his work on the subject. Darwin famously  compared facial expressions in humans to those in animals: whether the cheeks were full and high, thus showing happiness, etc..”

We all know that we judge people’s appearance, thus making our own deductions about their character. Such a judgment is often made within seconds of seeing the stranger’s face for the first time. Judgments about generic characteristics tend to be the same (e.g. perception of threat or welcome in someone’s eyes, their smile etc.). As the new JAMA study shows, these perceptions can be manipulated by plastic surgery, which changes the appearance of a person’s resting facial expression.

For the small study, the researchers took before-and-after photos of 30 white women who had recently undergone various facial plastic surgery procedures, including face-lift, eyebrow lift, neck lift, eyelid surgery and/or chin implant surgery. Then, each individual photograph was rated by dozens of study participants for six personality traits: aggressiveness, extroversion, likeability, trustworthiness, risk-seeking and social skills.

They found that the women’s post-operative photos were rated as being more likeable, higher in social skills, more feminine and more attractive. There was no significant change, however, in perceived trustworthiness, risk-seeking, extroversion or aggressiveness.

Why? “I made similar conclusions twenty years ago,” Dr. Fisher comments. “Face-lifts and lower eyelid procedures are the most telling here. These surgeries can easily increase the curvature of the lips, mouth, stretch the skin an increase the freshness around the eyes. Some of it can even be achieved non-surgically but, of course, the surgery will have more lasting result and a more radical and immediate positive impact on person’s life.”